The Discretion of Judges and the Analogical Application in Japanese Legal Practice

Toshihiko Suehisa

Abstract


The Japanese legal system has been radically changed after the Meiji Restoration. Moreover, after the unconditional surrender of Japan, the American law has been partially adopted. The law sources in Japan are – first and foremost – acts, or customary law, such as trade or regional practices. A particular role in the Japanese legal system is played by precedents. The author analyses the precedent issues in the context of the judicial discretion and explains the nature of its exceptionally broad scope. Furthermore, the article examines the process related to applying analogy (per analogiam reasoning) by courts as a possible manner of law development.


Keywords


precedent; discretion of judges; ratio decidendi; Japanese legal practice

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17951/sil.2018.27.1.95
Data publikacji: 2018-05-02 07:55:24
Data złożenia artykułu: 2018-02-10 23:51:01

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